Juror Information

      What You Should Know

 
1. How are Jurors Selected?
2. What are the Requirements for being a Juror?
3. What are the different Types of Juries?
4. How Long does a Juror have to Serve?
5. What Happens when I Appear for Jury Service?
6. Is it possible that I might Report for Service but not sit on a Jury?
7. What Rules do Jurors have to Follow?
8. How does a Jury Decide a Case?
9. How Many Jurors must Agree on a Verdict?
10. What are the Benefits of Serving on a Jury?
11. Are You a Juror with Disabilities?
12. Jury Service Video Brochure
(ohiojudges.org)
 


How many jurors must agree on a verdict?

The type of case determines the number of jurors who must agree on a verdict.

A civil case is usually between two or more persons, companies or corporations who have a dispute concerning money or property. The party suing for compensation is called the "plaintiff." The party being sued is called the "defendant." In a civil case, the jurors must decide if and/or how to compensate the plaintiff for any damages. In civil cases, six (6) jurors (three-fourths of the eight jurors) must agree on a verdict.

In a criminal case, the "defendant" is a person charged with a crime. A crime is a violation of a law enacted by the legislature to protect our basic rights. Because crimes are considered acts against the state, and because the state is responsible for legally enforcing the laws of the people, the State of Ohio prosecutes these cases as the "plaintiff." In a criminal case, twelve (12) jurors determine if an accused person is guilty or not guilty of a charge, and the verdict must be unanimous.

 

 
     
 
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